Gillian Butsch, PT, DPT

Hi, I’m Gillian Butsch. I graduated from Colby College in Maine with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology. Following school I decided to explore the mountains, which led me to guide backpacking, mountain biking and climbing trips across the western US and Alaska, including guiding for the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) and being a Wilderness First Responder for 8 years. Leadership training and outdoor experience influenced my desire to provide for and instruct people with cognitive and physical disabilities. This led me to a full-time position as a ski instructor and summer volunteer with Teton Adaptive Sports.

During this time I was also working in an outpatient physical therapy clinic in Jackson, and discovered I had a true passion for physical therapy. I went back to school and earned my Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) from the University of Montana in Missoula in 2016. I enjoy the challenge of working with people of all ages and a variety of conditions, and prioritize treating each patient with an individualized plan of care to keep people healthy and involved in their favorite activities.

My specialties include:

  • Orthopedic and sports physical therapy
  • Manual therapy
  • Muscle energy techniques
  • Therapeutic exercise
  • Vestibular rehabilitation including post-concussion
  • Dry needling
  • Strain-counterstrain

Ice hockey in the Tetons

I love treating the active population of Jackson Hole, but also have clinical experience with a diverse patient population including people with spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries, stroke and other neurologic conditions. I have recently developed a keen interest in vestibular rehabilitation and treating people with post-concussive symptoms.

When not in the PT clinic, I am passionate about the outdoors, including exploring the Tetons, backpacking, skiing, and playing ice hockey.

My personal PT tip:  Early identification and treatment of faulty movement patterns or painful motions can help prevent long-term damage and disability.  “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” –Ben Franklin